BM# 75: A-Z Bake Around the World: Day 5
Bake of the Day: E for Eier Kichel
Country: Eastern European

I borrowed ‘The Hot Bread Kitchen‘ cookbook from the library to help in picking recipes for this baking marathon. I already posted this Bialys recipe from the book. Here’s another one: Eier Kichel (don’t even ask me of to say it — I have no clue). I call them egg cookies because this recipe has quite a few eggs in it.
Jewish Egg CookiesThese cookies are more like semisweet crackers — they are crispy and crunchy. They are not very sweet since most of the sugar is sprinkled on top and not mixed into the dough. These are made in the Jewish community and are usually served as an accompaniment to gefilte fish.Jewish Egg CookiesJewish Egg CookiesEier Kichel translates from Yiddish as a cookie made with egg. The dough is quite sticky, which helps in the cookies forming a dome after baking. If they are sprinkled lightly with sugar, they are great to serve with gefilte fish. But if they have to be served as cookies, then they are sprinkled generously with sugar.Jewish Egg CookiesMy Eier Kichel didn’t dome and puff up as much I hoped them to, but they tasted great. This is basically a very eggy dough, that is rolled out into small puris (discs) and then baked till they puff up or get golden brown.Jewish Egg CookiesI sprinkled some sesame seeds on top and they add nice nuttiness to the cookies. All in all a very interesting cookie recipe that I loves snacking on during tea time.Jewish Egg CookiesCheck out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 75.

 Loading InLinkz ...

Print Recipe
Eier Kichel Yum
Eier Kichel are Jewish cookies that are made with eggs. They can served as cookies or as an accompaniment to Gefilte fish. These cookies are crispy and are perfect tea time snack.
Eier Kichel
Course dessert
Cuisine european, jewish
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 20 minutes
Servings
Cookies
Ingredients
  • 3 Large Eggs
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp Sugar (plus more for sprinkling on the top)
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup+3tbsp all purpose flour
Course dessert
Cuisine european, jewish
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 20 minutes
Servings
Cookies
Ingredients
  • 3 Large Eggs
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp Sugar (plus more for sprinkling on the top)
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup+3tbsp all purpose flour
Eier Kichel
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the eggs until frothy.
  2. Whisk in the oil, salt, ½tsp of sugar and the baking powder.
  3. Add the flour in 2~3 additions until the dough starts to pull away from the bowl, adding more flour as needed. This is a very sticky dough, so don't add too much flour. Cover the dough and set aside for 20 minutes.
  4. Preheat the oven to 500°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.
  5. Roll the dough into a log and divide it into 12 equal pieces. Work with one piece of dough at a time on a well floured surface and keep the rest covered with plastic wrap,
  6. Roll each piece into a tight ball. Roll into a 4" disk no thicker then 1/8" -- use as much flour as needed to keep the dough from sticking.
  7. Put the round on the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining dough balls. Place 6 rounds per pan.
  8. Brush the rounds with canola oil and sprinkle each one with ¼~½ tsp of sugar (add more if you want them sweet).
  9. Put the baking sheets in the oven, reduce the temperature to 400°F and bake for 6 minutes.
  10. Reduce the oven temperature to 300°F and bake until the Eier Kichel turn golden brown, about 6~7 minutes longer.
  11. Remove the pan from the oven, transfer them to a wire rack and let cool completely. Store in an airtight container for up to a week.
Share this Recipe
Powered by WP Ultimate Recipe

10 thoughts on “Eier Kichel (Jewish Egg Cookies) Recipe”

  1. These cookies have turned out beautifully, Pavani. I made them during Bake-a-thon and all of us at home loved it. The sesame seeds on top is a nice touch!

  2. This surely is a wonderful find, if only it didn’t have so many eggs added! .I think the taste will completely change if we attempt making it eggless. So good that you borrowed a book to make all these lovely bakes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *